Space

A CME [coronal mass ejection] might be heading for Earth. It was hurled into space on Jan 14th (1333 UT) by a C4-class explosion in the magnetic canopy of southern sunspot AR2925: movie.
Given the CME’s southern trajectory, much of it will miss Earth. Nevertheless, say NOAA forecasters, a glancing blow is possible late on Jan 16th to midday on Jan. 17th. 
https://spaceweather.com/

Ydun Ritz (2022-01-16)

Space

Between solar wind streams and Solar Cycle 25.
Earth is in a void between solar wind streams. Quiet conditions are expected to prevail until the next stream arrives on Jan. 16th. This forecast could be upended by a solar flare. The sun is dotted with 3 numbered sunspot groups (and a 4th unnumbered region now emerging); unexpected explosions could occur at any time.
Solar Cycle 25 is heating up. New sunspot counts from NOAA confirm that the young solar cycle is outperforming the official forecast. You are here: Sunspot counts have exceeded predictions for 15 straight months. The monthly value at the end of December 2021 was more than twice the forecast, and the highest in more than 5 years. The “official forecast” comes from the Solar Cycle Prediction Panel representing NOAA, NASA and International Space Environmental Services (ISES). Using a variety of leading indicators, the Panel predicted that Solar Cycle 25 would peak in July 2025 as a relatively weak cycle, similar in magnitude to its predecessor Solar Cycle 24. Instead, Solar Cycle 25 is shaping up to be stronger.
https://spaceweather.com

Mike Terry to WOR iog (2022-01-12)

Space

Chance of Christmas storms (Updated):
Multiple M-class solar flares this week have hurled at least two faint CMEs toward Earth. NOAA forecast models predict glancing blows on Dec. 24th and 25th. The impacts, albeit weak, could combine to produce G1-class geomagnetic storms and high-latitude auroras during the Christmas holiday.
https://spaceweather.com/

Ydun Ritz (2021-12-24)

Space

Minor geomagnetic storms are possible on Dec. 3rd when a CME might sideswipe Earth’s magnetic field. The storm cloud was hurled into space on Nov. 29th by an erupting filament of magnetism in the sun’s southern hemisphere. According to NOAA computer models, the bulk of the CME should sail south of our planet with a near miss just as likely as a glancing blow.
https://spaceweather.com/

Ydun Ritz (2021-12-02)